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. the attacks happened at a time when tensions are high between the u.s. and india's ah enemy pakistan. reza, what is the strategy of multiple bombs in multiple locations? tell us about both the motive and the likely perpetrators of these attacks. >> well, it certainly bears the hallmarks of a group like lashkar-e-taiba, of course, the group responsible for the devastating 2008 attack on mumbai. at the same time, i think investigators are saying that the relatively small scale of this attack and the fact that the bombs were rather crude. there were actually ieds, martin, incates that it could be an indigenous terror organization, an organization known as the indian mujahadin which may or may not have links to lashkar-e-taiba but that remains to be seen. no one has accepted responsibility just yet. >> you say these were small devices, but 21 people killed, and at least 113 injured is not small. secretary of state hillary clinton is scheduled to visit india next week, but the united states is currently in a very tense situation with india's rival pakistan, as you know. does the u.s. have to tr
. >>> there is no doubt that u.s. relationships with iran and pakistan are both complex and problematic. earlier we reported on the defense secretary leon panetta discussing iranian arms in the hands of the iraqi insurgents and the obama administration is confirming that $800 million in military aid where osama bin laden was captured will be held. michael hamlin is director of research and senior policy fellowt ta brookings institute, and he joins us now. michael, we have heard of the iranian arms being used against the american forces in iran, and how do you stop it? is there anything that the administration can do to coerce the iranians to stop supplying arms to insurgents? >> well, it is a great question and serious question, because several hundred americans at a minimum and sol some of your co, the brits, have died at the hands of iranian weaponry. it is a lower number, but now it is rearing its ugly head again. and now iraqi forces have to be the focus there, so if you are focusing on iraq, the border securities are adequate that if president nuri maliki wants to go after the extremists insid
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
.s. cutting the pursestrings to pakistan. we'll get reaction from senator bob casey. . and we expect to hear from house speaker john boehner just moments from now on the debt talks. we'll bring those comments to you live when they happen. you're watching "andrea mitchell reports.". there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. [ male announcer ] the davis twins... ...are alike in nearly every way... ...right down to brushing their teeth. so how did only one get gingivitis? well, one in two people do. so i told karen about new crest pro-health clinical gum protection toothpaste. it helps eliminate plaque at the gumline, helping prevent gingivitis. it's even clinically proven to help reverse it in just 4 weeks. and it protects these other areas dentists check most. looks like the twins are even aga
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you, drawn down 33,000 troops by september of next year, good shape in kandahar and helmand province. how can you maintain momentum and win a war when you're pulling out 1/3 of the best soldiers you've got. >> a couple of things, one, we're having as we had with a bond conference in 2001. what's interesting is as we were talking about troop deployments and actual mission and strategy, we're in the process of escalating the troop numbers. now we're having the reconciliation with the taliban and networks, etc., as we're decelerating. that factors in to the larger conversation. the second thing that's important to remember about the troop assignments is how many will be combat troops or support troops. what are the areas you're going to pen trade in to and hold on to the areas as well. >> "the new york times" reporting this morning that the obama administration officials believe that pakistan's spy agency ordered the killing of a pakistani jou
$800 million in military aid to pakistan right next door, because there's been some tension, obviously, since the killing of bin laden. but what happened is that panetta said, we've got to show them that this has to be a two-way street in this relationship. and they feel like this could force pakistan to stepping up to the plate and k being more aggressive in trying to take out those safe havens on the border. >> we shall see. jim miklaszewski traveling with the new secretary of defense, leon panetta. stay safe in your travels, my friend. >> reporter: okay, chuck. >>> she may have been first lady for less than three years, but what a legacy. betty ford is one of the nation's most beloved first ladies. she broke preconceived notions of that role, always speaking her mind, and after politics, she left her most well-known and lasting impact of helping get rid of the stigma associated with addiction. so who better to help us remember the former first lady of the united states than dooris kearns goodwin. nice to see you. >> thank you, chuck. >> she may be more familiar with most americans l
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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